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  • The Nightingale

    The Nightingale

    ★★★★

    “Shame on you whore, you’re disgusting!”

    This was the heckle that reverberated around the auditorium after The Nightingale received its world premiere at last year’s Venice Film Festival, the applause for the festival’s only female director in competition drowned out by the angry insult from one man, appalled at what he’d just seen. It’s the sort of vile, misogynistic comment that should forever cause shame for the man who yelled it, and one that feels especially tasteless after sitting through…

  • The Farewell

    The Farewell

    ★★★

    The phrase “adapted from a podcast” should send a shiver down the spine of any audience member, but five years removed from her debut feature, Lulu Wang has spent a considerable amount of time developing a film based on an episode of This American Life she guested on. It doesn’t hurt that the semi-autobiographical tale has a simple, ingenious premise that any screenwriter searching for a high concept would kill for: a woman getting told her grandmother is dying, but…

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  • The Lighthouse

    The Lighthouse

    ★★★★

    In an era when most budding horror filmmakers look up to James Wan, emulating his jump scare schtick wherever they feel fit, a boldly original voice in the genre like Robert Eggers needs to be celebrated. After the critical success of his abstract 2016 horror The Witch, he signed on to direct a reimagining of Nosferatu - but with that project seemingly fallen by the wayside, he’s instead channelled his desire to update the early horror films of the German…

  • It Follows

    It Follows

    ★★★★

    With the blockbuster success of Fifty Shades of Grey in cinemas worldwide, many pundits are claiming that this marks a new era for “sex positive” movies- and much more importantly, the basic idea of a woman being as sexually open as her male counterparts not being a source of cinematic shame, but one of pride. It’s only been two decades since what I dub the “unofficial Michael Douglas misogyny trilogy” of Fatal Attraction, Basic Instinct and Disclosure hit cinemas, films…