Pet Sematary ★★½

Review In A Nutshell:

The dead should remain dead, but here in Kevin Kölsch and Dennis Widmyer’s Pet Sematary the dead return, and does so with a vicious edge to them. The film tampers with the concept of risen evil while emotionally welling from the traumatic grief that humans are often vulnerable to. Its primary engine is motivated by the curiosity, desperation, and impulsiveness of the human condition, which in turn can prove to be infuriating to those who desire characters on actually dwelling deeply with the morality of their individual decisions. Pet Sematary manages to impart a sense of sympathy towards these characters, but such chosen decisions were given little to explore, with instead a significant highlight found on the horror tactics mechanically engineered into its narrative. It seeks to thrill us, shake us, feed onto our expectations of being horrified, but it is a fleeting feeling, eventually questioning its rationalisation and effectiveness in its emphasis on the deeper subtexts, only to realise that the entire thing is only a glass half full.