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  • A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2: Freddy's Revenge

    A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2: Freddy's Revenge

    ★★★★

    Nightmare on Elm Street was my favorite horror series as a kid, but this sequel was the one I've seen the least. Watching it for the first time as an adult I can see why: It's arguably darker than its predecessor, its humor is a bit more arch, and there are character dynamics going on that I most certainly would not have understood as a prepubescent. To top it all off, it completely throws out "the rules" established in the first movie in favor of something more weird and abstract.

    It's great.

  • Crooklyn

    Crooklyn

    ★★★★★

    "Ladybug, you turned out pretty good considering you were raised in a house full of ashy, rusty-butt boys."

    What could have very easily been navel gazy or schmaltzy is handled with such grace and charm, a loving tribute to a sister and a mother (with only a few scenes centered on the clear Spike analog, mostly shown with his fishtank glasses pointed at a Knicks game on TV). CROOKLYN is rich with details and set to a soundtrack that would…

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  • Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me

    Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me

    ★★★★★

    "There's no tomorrow... Know why, baby? 'Cause it'll never get here." _ Jacques Renault, blank as a fart
    "Good morning, America" - Carl, after 9 a.m.

    Edges out The Sopranos hard cut to black scored with "Don't Stop Believin'" in the category of greatest way (/metastatement) to end a TV series. Opening on a television showing static (that is subsequently smashed), it's hard not to read some aspects as Lynch venting frustrations. Characters literally vanish. Cooper is anxious to see…

  • A Serious Man

    A Serious Man

    ★★★★★

    Fiddling with the aerial doesn't always make the signal more clear. The cat is both dead and not dead (Clive understands the dead cat, but not the math). The man in the prologue is or isn't a dybbuk. The bookends suggest an unbroken cycle that may or may not relate to what characters have and haven't done. "Accept the mystery."

    Rabbi Nachtner: "We can't know everything."
    Larry Gopnik: "It sounds like you don't know anything! Why even tell me this…